Coronavirus and working from home

Reflections from lockdown by Caroline Condillac

Contemplating the new working environment from a Keratoconus perspective has been interesting

Positives

We are good at washing our hands and being resilient 

For many of us we have to adapt to situations at both home and work and know the importance of trying to protect ourselves from infection

If we are able to work at home, we don’t have to contend with variable vision and lighting affecting our ability to travel to and from the workplac

A corneal graft does not mean that we needed to shield “Fit, healthy recipients who are not immune suppressed are not included in the vulnerable list, it is only if they have other conditions

Challenges

Eye drops and lenses require us to touch our faces more often

Social distancing makes it harder to see things, I usually like to get closer to see people’s expressions, read signs and find information (saying that I haven’t been out much but as lockdown starts to ease this is likely to change)

Familiar environments have changed to allow for social distancing and so familiar places are different to navigate

Adaptations to a different way of working

I’m fortunate that mostly my job can be done remotely from home. I have found that while everything is done in a virtual way, screen time has increased and I didn’t expect to spend my working day sitting at the dining table. 

Things to consider if not already in place

Are you able to bring screens and office equipment home? I’ve got my larger screen at home which has made a huge difference

Have you picked the best spot at home for lighting? Is there a better place n the kitchen or bedroom that you haven’t considered or is it worth changing location part way through the day

Different ways of meeting

In my working world we are using Teams as our virtual meeting space

Socially and as part of the Keratoconus Committee group we have used Zoom. This has enabled us to keep in to contact and plan to for the future. Although the conference has been postponed, we discussed the importance of having places to meet and share our keratoconus experiences. With people at home the website and forum has seen an increase in visits. Zoom coffee mornings are proving popular and a successful platform to share with others

Time in lockdown has been a rollercoaster of emotions for most people, but it has given time to think, read and consider our lifestyles. This includes a working environment that has changed, certainly in the short to medium term and maybe forever. 

Changes to home working set up

When the news of the late Summer was that I would be working from home until at least Christmas and maybe now Eater and beyond, we were encouraged to take more time to look at working conditions. As both myself and my husband were now co-working from home, we needed to create spaces that would work for longer.

So I am fortunate in that the local authority that I wok for allocated a budget of up to £100 to purchase equipment to enable home working. Speaking to friends, it did seem that many larger companies and organisations had set up a covid fund for this purpose.

I did some online research and purchased a desk and proper office chair as we both had achy backs from months on a static dining room chair! (should have sorted this sooner but didn’t realise we would be at home for so long)

This enabled me to choose a better spot to work in the back bedroom, where lighting is better and my monitor is in a much better position. We have now been asked to complete a DSE (Display screen equipment) assessment and we are then able to apply for funding in addition to the £100 should further equipment be required

Notes to self

  • Undoubtedly you are spending more time staring at a screen so remember to take regular breaks (this was an outcome from an occupational health assessment that I had prior to covid)
  • Be strict on start and end times, just because your desk is now 12 paces from your bed, you shouldn’t be working longer hours!
  • Let your line manager know if you are struggling and ask if there is support for further equipment and/or more flexible working hours
  • Take a proper lunch break away for your screen, spend some time outside or maybe go for a walk
  • Remember that you employer has a duty of care to offer the support that you need

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