Taking sight for granted

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Libby
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Taking sight for granted

Postby Libby » Sun 07 Jan 2007 8:28 pm

Hi there
Just wondered if any of you felt the same as me. For nearly 19 years I had perfect vision - I never once thought about it or was grateful for it - it was just something that I totally took for granted. Then at the age of around 19 until the age of 22 my sight completely and utterly failed. Where I live (in Derbyshire in the early 80's) there was very little information available and even less support.
Like many of you I have had my up's and downs over the years, it hasnt been easy but if I could draw one postive from this situatiion it is that every morning without fail - as my lens goes in and my world comes into focus I thank god for my sight.
:!:

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jayuk
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Postby jayuk » Sun 07 Jan 2007 8:40 pm

Indeed...you dont know what you got until you dont have it anymore...then you appreciate what you had.....
KC is about facing the challenges it creates rather than accepting the problems it generates -
(C) Copyright 2005 KP

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Andrew MacLean
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Postby Andrew MacLean » Mon 08 Jan 2007 7:30 am

When I was a boy I had a blind aunt who always told me to cherish sight because I could never know when I might lose it. She had suffered from Glaucoma and her sight loss was total as she'd had both eyes removed.

When my sight began to fail I remembered her words, and I still remember them every day. I think the memory of her helped me deal with the daily indignities, the often angry impatience with which disabled people are met.

When my sight recovered I noticed again how beautiful the world was. I think I was always pretty good at appreciating beauty in the natural and the built environment and even of the people I meet, but restored sight gave me a new perception of the sheer glory of the world.

I too give thanks every day, not only for sight (or the prospect of having sight restored), but also for the beauty by which I am constantly surrounded.

Andrew
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GarethB
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Postby GarethB » Mon 08 Jan 2007 8:24 am

Even post graft it is easy to slip in to the old routine and take vision for granted.

First graft was in 1989, second in 1990 and although I was always aware I had had a graft, by the late nineties with absolutly nothing wrong and still no need for glasses I was taking my vision for granted in that I never worried about it. Still took all the common sense precautions regatrfding eye protection at work and working on my cars.

Was not until 2004 when my vision drastically changed in the 1989 grafted eye while I was racing in Germany!

I think it is just human nature to take things for granted if they have no impact on our daily lives.
Gareth

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K Reading
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Taking sight for granted

Postby K Reading » Mon 08 Jan 2007 1:19 pm

Every morning when I 'put in my eye' as it is known in the family I am grateful I can see well enough to see my childrens faces and do the normal things people do like reading the paper, watching T.V.,checking the prices on things in the shops, enjoying the views when I walk the dog, cooking without burning myself and still being able to drive to town. On the odd day when I can,t 'get my eye in' I can't do these things.So I find I am always aware of how wonderful sight is and also always at the back of my mind afraid of losing it.

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Alison Fisher
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Postby Alison Fisher » Mon 08 Jan 2007 2:11 pm

Even though it's been many years since my grafts I am thankful every day for the sight they give me and that they have allowed me to get rid of my incredibly painful lenses and go back to wearing glasses. To be able to slip my specs on and see well will never get old.

What I do find sad is how people who've never had sight problems, or any kind of health problem, take their good health for granted and have so little understanding for those who do have problems.

Over Christmas we spent a lot of time visiting family we don't often see and in one household I was treated as if I was being awkward because the lighting they had irritated my eyes. Not wanting to dominate or ruin the get together I tried to explain quietly but they just didn't get it at all and I ended up sitting there with my eyes closed. It was absolutely ridiculous. The lack of understanding and caring about my discomfort was very upsetting. I find because it's so long since my grafts people think I'm 'cured' and my sight is the same as theirs. No one outside of my household seem to understand that there will always be ongoing issues. I'm not a pushy person and I don't want a lot of fuss so I keep quiet but sometimes it gets to me a bit.
grafts in 1992 and 1996

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GarethB
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Postby GarethB » Mon 08 Jan 2007 2:19 pm

I had a similar experience in Germany last Easter when my inlaws and wifes aunt were laughing at me for wearing dark glasses.

After a couple of days of this and they had been saying not nice things to my wife (their daughter) I got up and moved all the spot lights so we each had one in our eyes and said 'Now do you see why I need dark glasses?'.

Nothing more was said and it is now accepted I have sight problem which canbe agrevated by differing light levels.

What annoyed me and drove me to my action, all my inlaws have worked or still work in hospitals!
Gareth

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Pat A
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Postby Pat A » Mon 08 Jan 2007 3:47 pm

I really know where you are all coming from.
I have been feeling very down since the New year, as it has been intimated to me that I should be back at work - even though I can't see to do my job until I get my RGP's (11 days and counting! And I do pray that I can tolerate them - I'm scared stiff at the moment). These comments have been made by people who simply do not - and don't seem to want to - understand the problems we face, and although I do try and be positive it can be really hard. They don't understand how much I would really rather be at work than be stuck at home with poor eyesight. It has been exacerbated because someone else has been off , having had surgery for the big C - and who has now returned. But at least she is getting better and recovering whereas I am no better than the moment when I first went off (in fact my sight has deteriorated since then). I have tremendous smpathy for the other girl, as she must be quite scared in other ways, but I feel as if my problems are being dismissed as trivial when compared with hers - and the truth is , they should not be comparing us at all! Sorry if I've diversified a bit but having a bad day today...
Pat
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We do not stop playing because we grow old;
We grow old because we stop playing.

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GarethB
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Postby GarethB » Mon 08 Jan 2007 5:43 pm

Pat,

If your employers are causing trouble, get in touch with Action for The Blind as it sounds like your employers if they are not careful will or are in breach of the diasability discrimination act.

Search for them on Google.

Have you gone through the employers leaflet with your employers?

I have found it is one thing sending such things but they never get read properly, but go and visit them with it and go through each point in detail the penny soon drops.

With cancer most of us know someone who has had it or died from it. Everyone is aware of the common treatment strategies for cancer. Four members of my familly have all died from it, but so few people know about KC so are ignorant of the effects.
Gareth

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Pat A
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Postby Pat A » Mon 08 Jan 2007 10:17 pm

Gareth
Many Thanks - I've looked Action for the Blind up and will give them a call tomorrow.
I have sent my boss the leaflet, but I guess you are right - I doubt if he has read it - and if he has, well he has made no attempt to discuss it with me. I'm also trying to set up a "case conference meeting" with him and the Occupational health person to discuss how my return to work should be managed but it's proving difficult...I'm not his priority and the OH nurse is busy too. Guess I'll have to push harder.
I'm also going to revisit the KC DVD tomorrow- and study your presentation about going back to work in more detail! It looked v useful first time through. Got to get my motivation back somehow.

Pat
Pat

We do not stop playing because we grow old;
We grow old because we stop playing.


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